Wednesday, February 28, 2007

I believe the different stereotypes are divided in into three main groups: lower, middle, and upper class. There is such thing as lower middle and upper middle, but they are only the subdivisions of the main groups. The stereotyping of people does change the appearance of a certain character. No matter if your the opposite of the group, if you have multiple things in common you will be judged as one of them. So if the African Americans and the Ewells are classified as the lower part, does this make Calpurnia and other people like her part of the group? Do you think that she should be treated in the middle class range or like the rest?

11 comments:

floridaprincess said...

I think that she, as well as everyone else, should be treated equally. I agree that there are stereotypes in this town, but I think some of them, like the Ewells, are simply there because the people know the family and that's really what their like. Scout didn't seem to think of the Ewell boy as less than her, at least not to me...she was just explaining to the teacher. Others, like the way the kids stereotype Boo, are more harmful. Like many stereotypes, this is formed because they assume the worst. I think that this is going to get them, or at least someone in thisi story, into trouble, before the end of the story.

Kaminous_the_Great said...

I extremely agree with floridaprincess. I believe everyone should be treated equally, but seeing the time period of this book, it is inevitable for stereotyping to occur. Someone is going to get themselves into trouble before the end of the story, and you can see some foreshadow of this to be. For example, Atticus keeps telling Jem to lay off "Boo" Radley, but Jem keeps going at it. Also, when Scout asks Miss Maudie about "Boo" (aka Arthur) and some of the rumors, she basically gets told off, and corrected (I know that I went into the rumor area, but stereotyping and rumors kind of corinrelate(sp), don't you think?). We will just have to keep reading to find out what happens...

Han Solo said...

I agree with the two posts before me, Calpurnia is a very classy person and is probably above the other African Americans in the area. Calpurnia shouldn't be lumped in with other African Americans because of their rank socially as a whole. Of course there are exceptions to any generalization or stereotype, and Calpurnia is one of them. She has a good home and does an important job, living in better conditions than the others in her "class." Honestly I believe stature should determine how people are treated, not leaving out common decency though. Respect should be earned, not given according to "class" or the color of skin.

Benjamin Disraeli said...

Stereotyping, as has been previously said, is inevitable. I believe that Scout does see the Ewell boy beneath her. She also sees that whats his name who came to her house below her level. And while that kid probably doesn't deserve it, that no good ewell probably earned the title pretty well.
As far as Boo Radley is concerned, is it possible that Boo wants the attention? That he likes the kids but is just too shy to actually show himself to them? I wonder...

Tourettesguy said...

I think Calpurnia doesn't care how she is thought of by the other people in Maycomb, she is happy being who she is. Obviously she has the respect of Aticus, as well as Jem, Scout, and Dill, and she does not need to worry about what other people think about her. I don't think that the children are very concerned with stereotypes, especially about someone they are as close to as Calpurnia. Scout did seem like she thought she was better than the Cunninghams and the Ewells, because her family had a little money, and their kids went to school. Scout just didn't understand yet that even if someone is poorer than you are, you still should treat them like you want to be treated yourself.

homestar_runner said...

Florida princess and kaminous_the_great, I would also love for everyone to be treated equal. However, that is never going to happen. It definatley did not happen in the time period of this book and it does occur today, nor will it ever. In To Kill a Mockingbird, stereotyping African Americans as poor, uneducated people is common. I think Calpurnia is included in this group, just because of the time period, but I do not agree with it. She may be African American, however she is a very "classy" lady and has a good job. She is also loved by atticus and his family. They do not treat her like a slave, but treat her as one of her own family members. I think that African Americans still are stereotyped today. Do you think they are still sterotyped today, and if so how are they sterotyped?

The E of SHE said...

I, too, agree that everyone should be treated equally. However, the likelihood of that happening is slim to none. There are still stereotypes today, as there always will be, however I do not think they are as prominent as they used to be. For example, in the story, Calpurnia is classified as a poor, uneducated black women, though she is not uneducated and she is respected. This was a common stereotype in the days of this story. As time has passed, people have overcome this stereotype, and now, some of history's most influential people are African Americans. I think that throughout the course of the story people in the community will come to realize that people are more equal than previously thought. Atticus, I believe, already understands this and will play a key role in spreading this concept.

Loopfruit said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Loopfruit said...

I think that this book is basically built on stereotypes. Calpurnia, unfortunatly, is probably automatically assumed to be part of the lower class due to the unfair stereotypes. I think that she should be treated fairly and not judged because of her skin. Another example of stereotypes in this book is when Atticus chooses to represent Tom Robinson. Scout and Jem get treated badly because of their father's controversial decision to represent a black boy. "I guess it ain't your fault if Uncle Atticus is a nigger-lover.....but now that he has turned into a nigger-lover we'll never be able to walk the streets of maycomb again. He's ruinin the family..." (pg.83)-This was not fair of Aunt Alexandra to say, ecspecially in front of her son.

Master Shake said...

I agree the with the majority of the comments already posted. stereotyping is a huge problem people faced in that time period and even today. most people back then automatically thought that black people were afer there white women. this, in some cases might be true, but more than likely all black people are not after white womens virginity. do you think stereotyping can ever be discarded as a day to day classifying

thegoldenone7 said...

I think that Calpurnia is in the lower stereotype because she is an African-American. She is probably better off than most because the Finches treat her like family and provide for her. I think she is also an authority figure for Jem and Scout and is treated with respect from them. To the surrounding neighborhood and the Finches she is treated like a normal middle class person. In society she is probably considered lower class. I think she should be treated in the middle range like the rest of the people.